Canada’s first National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety a sold out success

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Canada’s first National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety a sold out success
Mon, June 06

Canada’s first National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety makes an astounding debut

Canada’s first National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety made an astounding debut in Toronto on May 30. Over 140 attendees joined simulation experts from hospitals across the country to listen to inspiring presentations on leading-edge research and achievements in simulation, participate in discussions, collaborate with colleagues and network. Several exhibitors were also on site to showcase their latest innovations in simulation.

“The first National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety was a tremendous success. Quality and safety advocates from across Canada heard dozens of examples from national leaders about how simulation-based approaches are achieving meaningful advances in patient safety and quality of care. It was an inspiring day for everyone involved,” said Dr. Tim Willett, interim president, SIM-one.

The groundbreaking initiative was a joint launch with IDEAS (Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors), Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), Accreditation Canada, Healthcare Insurance Reciprocal of Canada (HIROC), Health Quality Ontario (HQO), and HealthCareCAN. The overarching theme of the event was the growing evidence for using simulation to improve patient safety and quality of care.

“The Forum was an incredible gathering showcasing diverse approaches to integrating situation into quality and patient safety initiatives. I was impressed with the energy and innovations showcased from across the country and I enjoyed the chance to network with others with a mind toward future projects,” said Lennox Huang, chief medical officer, VP medical & academic affairs, the Hospital for Sick Children.

“Thank you to SIM-one and partners for bringing together the National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety. Hailing from British Columbia, it was great to hear about all the spectacular work going on in the rest of the country. Events like the Forum contribute to galvanizing the simulation community and it was great to be joined by the likes of Accreditation Canada and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute,” reflected Darin Abbey, director, Centre for Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Learning (CICSL).

2016 National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety 

Dr. Tim Willett, interim president, SIM-one, welcoming guests

Dr. Joshua Tepper, president and CEO, Health Quality Ontario (HQO), kicked off the Forum by sharing a personal story with a patient from earlier in the morning. His key takeaway for the audience was that simulation is critical “to ensure we provide the best care for our patients”.

Dr. Joshua Tepper, president and CEO, Health Quality Ontario (HQO) 

Following Dr. Tepper’s welcome remarks, Dr. Adalsteinn (Steini) Brown, director, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, discussed the challenges in quality improvement and opportunities for simulation.

“Simulation is no longer about competencies. We must shift our focus to teamwork, leadership, system engineering and improvement to ensure we reflect the complexity of our environment. We need to train our healthcare students right off the start with simulation and integrate simulation and quality improvement across all parts of training. We need to get people focused on improvement as a core element of their job,” said Dr. Brown.

Dr. Adalsteinn (Steini) Brown, director, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto 

Two rapid fire panel presentations on innovations, case studies and achievements in simulation, complemented the momentum of keynote speakers. National leaders in Canada stimulated the audience with a variety of innovative ways of applying simulation to improve quality of care and safety. Presentations included SOS! A Gaming App to Improve Care of the Elderly, Improving New Nurse Orientation with Simulation, Simulation for System Change and Staff Hiring, and Improving the Quality of Team Training and Performance During Interprofessional In-Situ Code Blue Simulations.

“Right from the start, people really enjoyed the vibe of the event. After the first keynote spoke, I heard lots of “Wow! That was a great talk!”. The rapid fire sessions were also terrific – offering delegates quick snapshots of a problem and how simulation helped with the solution – it was just amazing!” commented Philip De Souza, senior specialist, communications and partnership, HIROC.

Some of the rapid fire panel presenters

Some of the rapid fire panel presenters 

Dr. Glenn Posner, medical director, Simulation Patient Safety Program, The Ottawa Hospital, kicked off the afternoon portion of the Forum with an overview of the Ottawa Hospital’s Patient Safety Program. Read more about this inspiring initiative in SIM-one’s interview with Dr. Glenn Posner.

Dr. Glenn Posner, medical director, Simulation Patient Safety Program, The Ottawa Hospital

Up next was Dr. Vincent Grant, emergency physician and medical director for the KidSIM simulation program, Alberta Children’s Hospital, who emphasized the role of simulation in encouraging active learning.

“Experience drives everything we do and simulation can help bridge the gap of passive learning in medical education. Simulation is about recreating experience, which leads to quality of care. It’s no longer about if simulation has a role, it’s about how it has a role. It’s important to start developing a culture where people are thinking about simulation, to prevent errors from happening,” he said.

Dr. Grant also gave an overview of the KidSIM Program at Alberta Children's Hospital: Bringing Safety and Quality to the Bedside.

Dr. Vincent Grant, emergency physician and medical director for the KidSIM simulation program, Alberta Children’s Hospital

Closing the Forum was Dr. Teodor Grantcharov, staff surgeon, St. Michael’s Hospital, and Canada Research Chair in Simulation and Surgical Safety. Dr. Grantcharov inspired the audience with a presentation on how we can do better in the field of simulation.

“There is tremendous work out there that shows that simulation works and is an effective teaching modality. At the University of Copenhagen and University of Toronto, we conducted a study to see how general surgery residents develop basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills. We found that about 8 per cent of residents did not do well from the beginning to end. This is a problem where simulation can play a tremendous role. A well-designed simulation curriculum can identify these at-risk individuals early on, and give them feedback while they are still in medical school. This will save a tremendous amount of resources to the system, and the ROI will be significant and justifiable around such a curriculum in medical schools,” said Dr. Grantcharov.

Dr. Teodor Grantcharov, staff surgeon, St. Michael’s Hospital, and Canada Research Chair in Simulation and Surgical Safety

Attendees also enjoyed plenty of networking time to reconnect with colleagues and make new connections. In addition, they had the opportunity to speak with each presenter for further discussions and questions.

Further discussions with panel presenters 

Networking and sharing knowledge

Exhibitors Interaction Healthcare Canada, Laerdal Medical, MedaPhor Ltd., and Spectrum Nasco were also on-site to speak with audience members and discuss their latest products and services in simulation.

“The National Forum was a great way for clinicians, educators, researchers, health care administrators and all other simulationists to come together. Both the keynote speakers and rapid fire presentations were engaging and educational. Thanks so much!” said Dr. Doug Campbell, director of the neonatal intensive care unit and deputy chief pediatrics, St. Michael’s Hospital.

Following the excitement of the National Forum, SIM-one also presented SIM in Motion: A Day of Interactive Workshops the following day. Over 50 people participated in a variety of workshops and live demonstrations – led by SIM-one’s faculty experts – for an amazing hands-on simulation experience.

“I was very pleased with our first-ever SIM in Motion: A Day of Interactive Workshops event. We designed it to be a tasting menu of the breadth and depth of simulation, featuring elements from SIM-one’s courses, community engagements, and unique presentations in specialized topics in the field. The amount of positive feedback was overwhelming,” said Dr. Bruce Ballon, director of education, SIM-one.

“SIM in Motion was an opportunity to learn from enthusiastic and expert simulationists from across the province. Interactive half-day workshops allowed a learner to really go in-depth and explore areas of interest. It is so gratifying and exciting to see the level of commitment and knowledge in this province,” said Elizabeth Horsley, clinical simulation coordinator, department of nursing, Brock University.

SIM in Motion: A Day of Interactive Events

The 2016 National Forum on Simulation for Quality & Safety and SIM in Motion: A Day of Interactive Workshops were held at the Sheraton Gateway Hotel. Both events welcomed guests from all healthcare professions.

SIM-one especially thanks its partners who helped make the National Forum a terrific success. Thank you for your dedication, time and effort toward this important initiative.

As always – our gratitude extends to our community for its continued support of SIM-one and encouragement for the collective work that we do. Without your commitment, passion and accomplishments, the healthcare simulation field would not be where it is today.

For more photos, visit the SIM-one Facebook page.

See you on October 5 to 7 for the 2016 SIM Expo!

Sincerely, The SIM-one Team